Friday, June 7, 2013

A Day in the Life

It's amazing to me what teenage boys do behind closed doors. Yes, I know, because they can no longer close the door. At least not if they want some of the flow of the swamp cooler to waft through the place, which even they realize is so necessary with FIVE of them crammed into The Transporters less than pristine room.

It's been absolutely hysterical to listen in on them. Not on purpose, I'm not that controlling of a mother, but I am in the next room. I like to write sitting on my bed, in my newly remodeled sanctuary. I hear everything that goes on next door.

They are the kings of multitasking. Usually, there's a computer going with Minecraft (amazing game, requires creativity and thought and that you build your own world to “play” in), each had a DS in hand, they've reverted to elementary school and are catching Pokemon and trading them. Much of the conversation revolves around each monster's particular attributes and the debate gets heated. Meanwhile, SoccerBoy usually has brought over his TV and XBOX so two of those complete systems are also up and running. They're playing Halo, while playing Pokemon, while talking, and not just among themselves, they're on XBOX live and I hear SkinnyBoy's voice! I don't know how they do it.

One day the conversation left Pokemon and went to, of all places, differences in the criminal justice system in the US verses Spain. Loved being a fly on the wall for that one. I'll sum it up by saying corruption knows no country boundaries, apparently. The consensus was that it's bad all over, with politicians getting away with whatever they want. What amazed me though is that all the clicking of controllers, sliding of styluses, and building of worlds ceased during the discussion. I wonder what other topics have made them stop everything to talk.

They stay in that room for hours. We're talking twelve straight. They feed themselves. The Transporter will fire up the grill and make everyone hotdogs. Or they'll order their own pizza. They won't remove the used paper plates or those pizza boxes from the room, though. Maybe it's some sort of shrine to go with all the empty Arnold Palmer tea bottles which are in a pyramid of sorts in one corner.

Many of them spend the night. On the last day of school we had six. The boy from Spain cracked me up. The other guys just stay in the same clothes for days on end as the cycle of gaming and talking and eating and multitasking begin for another round.  Not Mr. Spain, he wore “suit” pj's. You know, the shirt with buttons and matching pants. With piped seams. Very classy.

We were THE house where everyone has gathered since we moved into the neighborhood. It was my secret wish that even when they got into their late teen years, they'd still want to hang out here. I didn't think it would happen though because our basement is so Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang, and the upstairs not a lot better. They don't seem to care. I guess all they want is to be left to do what they want, and occasionally have something to eat to fuel the many tasks at hand.


What have you learned about the species of teenage boy in your travels? Are you THE house? Would you want to be?

18 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

When I was a teen, I stayed in my room for hours and only hunger would make me venture out. I didn't have suit PJs though.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Tina .. I have no idea .. and thankfully don't have to think of the mess or noise, but I miss out on so much .. the fun, the laughter, the smells, the discussion points .. oh well - I'll catch the next instalment here ..

Interesting they stopped multitasking once they were discussing politics ..

Cheers to you and the weekend of boys ... Hilary

Brian Miller said...

ha. it is fun to listen in on what they are talking about...and sometimes it is amazingly insightful as well...minecraft will def suck you in....just saying...

Andrew Leon said...

I think we would be the house of there were kids my son's age in the neighborhood. I don't know. Actually, maybe not, because our kids don't have all of the cool electronic gadgets the other kids have, so mine would probably elect to go somewhere else. I know my daughter does, because we don't have TV or anything like that, and she just wants to be somewhere else.

Jeremy [Retro-Z] said...

the kings of multitasking... brilliant. wait years later they will tell you, we told our parents on the things we had done... to late to get in trouble.

Lucy said...

It is fun to be the house they hang out at, ours was the house too, and it is interesting to be the 'fly on the wall'. Enjoy it :)

Lucy from Lucy's Reality

JoJo said...

I have no experience with children or teens, but our apartment in San Francisco became the place for our Deadhead friends to hang out at, all the time. Everyone always asked if they could come over vs. our going to their places and we enjoyed spirited discussion about shows, venues, songs, etc. while listening to Dead tapes with the TV on mute.

Rachel said...

Its not just the parents who want to have THE house. Teenagers want to be THE house too.

klahanie said...

Hey Tina,

Ah yes, I most certainly can relate to this posting. My son, who is now 24, still spends several hours gaming.

My son, bless him, asks me when I'm moving out!

Must go now in case the light turns green...

Gary :)

Jo said...

I'm not sure I would want a roomful of teenage boys, thanks. You must be very patient people.

JO ON FOOD, MY TRAVELS AND A SCENT OF CHOCOLATE

Naila Moon said...

When I was teen, it was the same way. Everyone came to my place. When I had my own teens,Oh yes, my house (apartment) was the house!

I woke up one morning to go to work and had 17 teens sprawled across my two bedroom apartment. No joke!

Recently I was discussing with my son his room as a teen. He and a friend made the joke about making an aisle so the revolving people could walk through. The only thing was, it was no joke and I could close the door! ;)
~Naila Moon

Naila Moon said...

Where in CO do you live?

Annalisa Crawford said...

Ah, Minecraft... my boys could be on that all day long if I let them. They're still at the age where I can say no... especially because it's Hubby's X-Box and he likes to use it occasionally :-)

Silvia Villalobos said...

I think it's great to be the house. Mine is too young but sometimes has friends over mostly playing basketball and still acting silly. Yours are an interesting study. Sounds like quite the discussion they had...good to know teens discuss politics.

Silvia Villalobos said...

I think it's great to be the house. Mine is too young but sometimes has friends over mostly playing basketball and still acting silly. Yours are an interesting study. Sounds like quite the discussion they had...good to know teens discuss politics.

CA Heaven said...

I know their kind. We've also had lots of ten-boys (and some girls) visiting. They live their life in the basement, gaming, talking, watching ski movies and eating pizza (using the paper box as plate). In the summer (when it's light 24/7) they swap day and night. Sometimes when I go to work in the morning, I meet older boys buddies in the hall, when they're on the way home >:)

Cold As Heaven

Jenny said...

At 14, my oldest isn't quite so entrenched, but he's getting there. We are not 'the house.' Sometimes I wish we were, other times I'm glad we're not :-)

Maggie Winter said...

I encourage the same thing with my son and his friends, they may drive me crazy sometimes but I know they're safe and happy. :) Yeah I love being the house.